Have you ever wondered why your concrete is deteriorating and cracking? The culprit could be salt in the air. Salt air can cause significant damage to concrete over time. It causes a chemical reaction that makes it more porous, which leads to cracks in the surface. Concrete is already naturally porous, so this process speeds up quickly and gets worse with each passing day! In this blog post we will go over 11 steps on how you can save your concrete from damages caused by salt!

Step One: Determine the Source of Salt in Air.

When you notice your concrete deteriorating and cracking, it’s important to determine the source of salt in air before doing anything else. There are two ways that might be causing this problem – a chemical reaction with chlorine from rain or snowmelt can mix with vehicle exhaust fumes to create chlorides which corrode concrete, but if there is no other indication then high-salinity levels may have caused an efflorescence on the surface (that whitish powdery substance). This will need to be cleaned off by using a wire brush.

Step Two: Clean Your Concrete Surface While Salty Efflorescences Remain Present.

Once you know where the salinity is coming from, you can decide if it’s a temporary situation or not. If the efflorescence is caused by high salinity levels and will only return with rain or snowmelt then there’s no real need to do anything but wait for those natural events to come around again! The best thing you can do during this time is clean your concrete surface so that any salt deposits are removed as soon as possible.

Step Three: Repair Cracked Areas Immediately After Cleaning Up Efflorescences That Were Caused By High Salinity Levels.

For areas where efflorescences were caused by high-salinity levels, use drywall compound mixed with water to repair cracks in the surface of paving slabs or other exposed concrete areas. You will want to sand the area slightly before applying drywall compound for best results, then finish with a coat of sealant or acrylic concrete paint after it dries and is no longer sticky.

Step Four: Keep Concrete Surface Clean And Dry To Prevent Salty Efflorescences From Reappearing Due To High-Salinity Levels In The Air Again Next Winter.

For winter months, keep your surface clean and dry as possible so efflorescences don’t reappear in the following year! Make sure you wash off any salt deposits that may have come from deicing substances on sidewalks during this time period too – they can cause just as many problems if left alone to sit against exposed concrete surfaces. If high salinity levels are due to rain or snowmelt, then you will need to be vigilant about cleaning off all salt deposits as soon as they appear.

Step Five: Rinse Concrete Surfaces With Water To Remove Salty Efflorescences Caused By High-Salinity Levels Due To Rain Or Snow Melt And Avoid Contacting The Surface Directly With Chlorinated Solutions (Like Shower Drains). For areas where efflorescences were caused by high-salinity levels and it is not a temporary situation – make sure that when rinsing your concrete surfaces with water, you avoid contact with chlorinated solutions like those coming from shower drains because the chlorine can cause damage too! It’s also important to note that if your efflorescences are caused by a chemical reaction with chlorinated rain or snowmelt and not high-salinity levels, then the best thing you can do is wait for those natural events to come around again.

Step Six: Treat Concrete Surface With Salt Repellent To Prevent Salty Efflorescences Caused By High-Salinity Levels In The Air From Occurring Again. For concrete surfaces where efflorescences were caused by high salinity levels in the air, it’s important that salt be repelled from coming into contact with these areas so they don’t start deteriorating even more quickly! A good way would be using a sealant mixed with powdered sugar – this will prevent any kind of salty substance (whether rain, snowmelt or other outside influence) from sticking to the concrete surface.

Step Seven: Protect Concrete Surfaces With A Coating Of Sealant Or Acrylic Paint To Prevent Salty Efflorescences Caused By High-Salinity Levels In The Air From Reappearing Next Winter. For areas where efflorescences were caused by high salinity levels in the air and you are not able to protect with a sealant mixed with powdered sugar then it’s best to apply all of these products as soon as possible – this will help prevent future damage! One solution is using acrylic paint because it can last up to ten years (depending on how often your sidewalk sees traffic), but sealants can also be applied to concrete surfaces to help prevent future damage.

Step Eight: Treat The Concrete Surface With A Coating Of Sealant Or Acrylic Paint To Prevent Salty Efflorescences Caused By High-Salinity Levels In The Air From Reappearing Next Winter. For areas where efflorescences were caused by high salinity levels in the air and you are not able to protect with a sealant mixed with powdered sugar then it’s best to apply all of these products as soon as possible – this will help prevent future damage! One solution is using acrylic paint because it can last up to ten years (depending on how often your sidewalk sees traffic), but sealants can also be applied to concrete surfaces, too.

Step Nine: Seal Concrete Surfaces With A Coating Of Acrylic Paint To Prevent Salty Efflorescences Caused By High-Salinity Levels In The Air From Reappearing Next Winter

Step Ten: Apply All Coatings As Soon As Possible – This Will Help Prevent Future Damage! One solution is using acrylic paint because it can last up to ten years (depending on how often your sidewalk sees traffic), but sealants can also be applied to concrete surfaces.

Step Eleven: Wait For Natural Events To Come Around Again If Your Efflorescences Are Caused By Chemical Reaction With Chlorinated Rain Or Snowmelt And Not Due To High-Salinity Levels.